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Where to see theater in St. Louis

With our many theater companies bringing exciting programming, from intimate cabaret-style performances to Broadway hits, to the stage each season, there’s no storage of opportunities to enjoy a show. Get to know the many groups bringing theater to life across the city, and don’t forget to check local venues for your chance to catch both regional companies and touring shows as they roll through town. 

Theater Companies

The Black Rep: The “theatre of the soul since 1976,” better known as The Black Rep, has a mission to provide platforms for creative expression from the African-American perspective. The Black Rep is one of the largest non-for-profit African-American theater companies in the country and has a long history of both producing and commissioning work by Black artists. 6662 Olive Blvd.

Kurtain Kall: Several South City high school alumni started Kurtain Kall in the 1980s, and the group has since become a registered non-for-profit theater company. Actors who are a part of Kurtain Kall “perform theater for the love of theater” and possess an ensemble spirit. 4200 Delor St.

Metro Theater Company: After meeting in 1973, artist Zaro Weil and educator Lynn Rubright were inspired to create Metro Theater Company, a professional touring theater for young people. They gathered young artists to entertain young audiences, and, in the past four decades, have toured nearly 40 productions. 3311 Washington Ave.

The Midnight Company: The Midnight Company, founded in 1997 by Joe Hanrahan and David Wassilak, focuses on new and interesting performances for the stage. The company’s cabaret performances at The Blue Strawberry, which have covered iconic figures such as Judy Garland and Linda Ronstadt, are especially beloved. 

Moonstone Theatre Company: Moonstone Theatre Company offers the community a range of quality productions and supports local arts and education. The independent, professional, women-owned theater company produces classics and new works to educate and inspire audiences. 210 E. Monroe.

New Line Theatre at Marcelle Theater: At New Line Theatre, actors aim to thrill, delight, challenge, and surprise through adventurous productions. “The Bad Boy of Musical Theatre,” as New Line Theatre has become known, was established in 1991 to offer alternative forms of theater entertainment. 3310 Samuel Shepard Dr.

Opera Theatre of St. Louis: Known for its vibrant annual festival, Opera Theatre of St. Louis is among the leading opera companies in the nation. Its recently launched New Works Collective keeps the OTSL ahead of the curve with an annual showcase of works by up-and-coming artists. 210 Hazel Ave.

Prism Theatre Company: This new theater on the block works to promote the work of women and emerging artists, including an annual festival of new works. Prism earned an A-List Editors’ Choice Award for “Theater Newcomer” in 2023.

The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis: The Rep is one of St. Louis’ most honored and followed theater companies, bringing several productions to COCA and the Loretto-Hilton each season. Founded in 1966, The Rep functions as a fully professional theatrical operation and belongs to the League of Resident Theatres. 130 Edgar Rd.

STAGES St. Louis: While STAGES is primarily based in St. Louis, the theater company hosts auditions in both St. Louis and New York City, mixing Broadway talent with professional St. Louis actors to produce performances that preserve and advance the art of musical theater. 210 E. Monroe Ave; 1023 Chesterfield Pkwy.

St. Louis Actors’ Studio: Through the use of ensemble work, St. Louis Actors’ Studio aims to explore themes of the human condition by producing collaborative theater. The company is housed in The Gaslight Theater and hopes to bring “a fresh vision” to St. Louis. 358 N. Boyle Ave.

St. Louis Shakespeare: In 1984, St. Louis Shakespeare was founded with the goal of professionally producing and performing the plays of William Shakespeare, alongside other dramatic classics, for St. Louis audiences. The company succeeded in producing Shakespeare’s entire canon in 2015 and celebrated with Blood Reigns, written for the company’s 30th anniversary. 4579 Laclede Ave.

St. Louis Shakespeare Festival: Though best known for its annual free production in Shakespeare Glen at Forest Park, the St. Louis Shakespeare Festival brings several performances to audiences all over the region each year through programs like the Confluence Regional Writers Project, TourCo, and Shakespeare in the Streets.

Stray Dog Theatre: Stray Dog Theatre’s mission is to create productions and programs that “challenge, educate, entertain, and inspire.” Founded in 2003 in hopes of “unleashing the art of theatre,” Stray Dog Theatre aims to reflect the human experience through the exploration of social issues. 2336 Tennessee Ave.

Take Two Productions: Established in 2004, Take Two Productions serves the purpose of providing all ages and races with the opportunity to “explore and develop” their talents through musical theater. The company promotes establishing connections through service to and financial support of local charities. 

That Uppity Theatre Company: Founded in 1989, That Uppity Theatre Company works to create original theater with underrepresented populations. The company also champions causes from climate action to voting rights. 

West End Players Guild: As a professional non-Equity theater company, West End Players Guild uses flexible staging to produce and present thought-provoking performances. The company held their first performance in the West End in 1911 and typically produces shows seldom performed by other companies. 733 Union Blvd.

Winter Opera St. Louis: Billed as a company dedicated to “performances that warm the soul,” Winter Opera is a non-profit organization that brings audiences multiple operatic productions during the winter months. Each show is presented in its original language with English supertitles. 2324 Marconi Ave.

Theater Venues 

COCA: On a mission to “enrich lives and build community through the arts,” COCA has become a national leader in innovative arts education through theater. As the fourth largest multidisciplinary community arts center in the country, COCA hopes to create a St. Louis community that is “creative, connected, and inclusive.” 6880 Washington Ave.

Edison Theatre: Located at Washington University, Edison Theatre is a teaching facility for the Washington University Performing Arts Department, which produces three main stage productions each year. It also hosts local orgs such as The Black Rep and Ballet 314. 6465 Forsyth Blvd.

The Fabulous Fox Theatre: The brass doors of The Fabulous Fox have welcomed more than 15 million people to performances of Broadway shows; Vegas acts; top pop, rock and comedy concert tours; and other events. The theater shut its doors in 1978, but the former movie palace was restored by Fox Associates and reopened four years later to continue providing some of St. Louis’ top entertainment. 527 N. Grand Blvd.

The Grandel: Operated by the Kranzberg Arts Foundation, The Grandel is a multi-use arts facility with a 600-seat state-of-the-art theater and a full-service bar and restaurant. The event space hosts concerts, plays, musicals, dance performances, comedy shows, and more. 3610 Grandel Sq.

Kirkwood Performing Arts Center: In the heart of downtown Kirkwood is Kirkwood Performing Arts Center, a venue for nearly every kind of production. With a complex that features the Ross Family Theater, a Studio Theater, a 2,000-square-foot event space, and an Event Lawn, Kirkwood Performing Arts Center hosts some of the region’s best performances. 210 E. Monroe Ave.

The Marcelle: The Marcelle features a state-of-the-art black box theatre, professional dance studios, and nonprofit office suites. Under the Kranzberg Arts Foundation, the theater hosts some of the most innovative productions in St. Louis. 3310 Samuel Shepard Dr.

The Muny: At the 1904 World’s Fair, St. Louisans developed a dream for a permanent outdoor theater in Forest Park, and The Muny had its first curtain call in 1916. The beloved local treasure has now been bringing live, outdoor theater to audiences for more than 100 years. 1 Theatre Dr. 

Stifel Theatre: Located in the heart of downtown is the historic, 3,100-seat Stifel Theatre, which opened in 1934 and has hosted guests including Frank Sinatra, Ray Charles, Bob Dylan, and The Rolling Stones. The space continues to host a variety of events after its $78.7 million restoration. 1400 Market St.

Touhill Performing Arts Center: At Touhill Performing Arts Center at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, both campus and community groups produce a diverse season of dance, theater, and live music performances. 1 University Blvd.

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